Missouri Wrestling Revival

Giving Back to Midwest Pro Wrestling!

  • Subscribe

  • 2015 MWR Yearbook on Sale

  • 2014 MWR Yearbook on Sale

  • 2013 MWR Yearbook on Sale

  • 2012 MWR Yearbook on Sale

  • 2011 MWR Yearbook on Sale

  • Pro Wrestling Tees

  • My 1-2-3 Cents

  • CAC

  • Rob Schamberger com

  • Shooter Spotlight

  • Sigs From the Bigs

  • Rings and Cages

  • NWA Alliance

  • Windy Wine Company

  • Wrestle Talk Podcast

  • Cold Meal Productions

  • Galaxy Wrestling All Stars Comics

  • Piekutowski Sausage

  • Pubcrawl Podcast

    Pubcrawl Podcast

Posts Tagged ‘Randy Savage’

Dartallion Allen Jr. Top Draw Randy Savage

Posted by flairwhoooooo on November 14, 2016

15094499_1216992885033575_3782259152707149444_n

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Jared’s Jumbles CCW Recap

Posted by flairwhoooooo on September 1, 2016

By Jared Smith
Video Credit Paul Beauchamp of Rasslin On Facebook

Cape Championship Wrestling made a splash in its inaugural show in July and this past weekend, they raised the bar once again with their CCW Homecoming show at the historic AC Brase Arena Building in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. The Arena Building was once a tour stop for International Championship Wrestling, which was ran by Angelo Poffo and featured his son’s Lanny Poffo and, oh what was his name…oh yeah, Macho Man Randy Savage! History flows through this building and now, Cape Championship Wrestling calls it home!

The night kicked off with promoter Ken Murphy and GM Hunter Hendricks in the ring, in which Hunter Hendricks noted that The Pinnacle, led by Jeff O’Dell, had been making things rough and that he was going to do his best to ensure that tonight went smoothly. Suddenly, The Pinnacle’s music hit. Jeff O’Dell, Sarge O’Riley, Billy Hills, Sarah Summers and CCW Champion, Brandon Barbwire, came to ringside. In a show of dominance, they cornered Hunter Hendricks, before Jeff O’Dell laid out his group’s plans for dominance for the evening, even saying they would show up in the main event.

The first match of the night featured a very well-traveled and well-respected veteran, “Tornado” Tony Kozina taking on young challenger CJ Shine. CJ Shine tried to us his overly confident (ie, cocky) demeanor to bully Kozina throughout the match. However, once Tony laid in some MASSIVE knife edge chops, the momentum slowly began to turn toward Kozina. Tony hit a vaulting senton bomb, then later hit a springboard bulldog to secure the win!

Up next, BT Daramola took on God’s Gift to Wrestling “Drop Dead” Dale Wylde. Daramola got the crowd behind him early on. Wylde, after he continued to admire himself in his mirror, slowed the pace of the match by grinding the momentum down and controlling the energy of Daramola. Wylde slipped in a few, well, less than honest attacks and ultimately took the win by a quick schoolboy roll up.

Sexy Sarge was up next and in the weeks prior to Homecoming, he had issued an open challenge, stating that if nobody answered it, he would still come down and give the fans a show. His idea of a show would be a tutorial on what he calls “porn star dancing.” Thank the Good Lord above that his challenge was answered while he was in the ring by none other than young star Hollis Giroux! Jeff O’Dell, assuming Hollis was out to join The Pinnacle, soon learned that Hollis was out there to stop Sarge’s display. This was a great match with a lot of back and forth action, even some outside interference from Jeff O’Dell. The match ended when O’Dell mistakenly tripped up Sarge while hitting the rops, which led to a Superkick and a victory for Hollis Giroux. After the match, Sarge and O’Dell had words which almost led to Sarge punching O’Dell when suddenly, Drop Dead Dale Wylde ran into the ring to save Jeff O’Dell! After that, O’Dell claimed that Sarge had been replaced by a younger, better looking version, to which Sarge replied that he didn’t need The Pinnacle, that he regretted the decision to join and was now out to reclaim the love from the fans.

Coming back from intermission, GM Hunter Hendricks came out to announce there was a change in the women’s match. Paloma Starr had been booked to take on Lil Bit, however, Paloma was unable to attend due to other obligations. Lil Bit’s new opponent turned out to be none other than her nemesis, Diamond Doll! Lil Bit and Diamond Doll had a match on the inaugural show, which resulted in Diamond Doll attacking Lil Bit after the bell. These two had another intense match with each other, featuring a lot of back and forth offense and flat out brawling. The ending saw Diamond Doll roll up Lil Bit and use the ropes for leverage for the win due to the fact that the ref didn’t see the feet on the ropes! I smell a rubber match coming!

The following match featured a title defense of the prestigious Missouri Heavyweight Championship, featuring champion Brandon Espinosa making his CCW debut against Farmer Billy Hills with Sarah Summers. Farmer got this match after he, seemingly, took out his prior opponent “The Fury” Jason Vaughn in what we will just call an automobile accident. Early on, Farmer used his size and strength to push Espy around the ring. Espy was able to turn the tides with his quickness and his own deceptive strength. Billy began favoring his shoulder midway through, but was still able to weather the storm of power moves, showing his grit and determination. Suddenly, Jason Vaughn’s music started playing and a bewildered Hills looked at the entrance. This gave Espy enough time to launch an attack that, in the end, resulted in a win from an armbar submission. What a performance from both guys and a great title defense from Espinosa!

The co-main event was up next, featuring The Monster, Jake Dirden against CCW Champion, Brandon Barbwire with Jeff O’Dell. Ever since winning the CCW Championship in July, Brandon has developed his boisterous personality, and came into the night with a large chip on his shoulder due to the fact he wasn’t in the main event. Jake Dirden came into the night with one thing in mind, to claim a title and destroy Barbwire. This match was a slugfest, with the champ, Barbwire, taking large amounts of punishment early on. However, Barwire absorbed the damage and turned the tides after throwing Dirden into the ring post outside. Toward the end of the match, Barbwire ran to grab the CCW Title belt and then brought it into the ring as a weapon! Dirden, seeing what was transpiring, knocked the belt from Barbwire’s hand, then hit The Cure on the belt! It looked like a sure-fire win, however, Jeff O’Dell distracted the referee long enough for Barbwire to be able to kick out of the eventual pin. This ignited the Monster, as he lunged for O’Dell, who was now on the ring apron. Barbwire attacked, but again was hit with The Cure, which again, O’Dell distracted the ref. Dirden went after O’Dell one more time, however, this time the champion was able to hit Dirden with the belt to take the win and hold onto his title.

The Main Event of the evening featured one of the biggest names on the independent wrestling scene across the world, Ricochet! There’s a chance you’ve seen him on Lucha Underground as Prince Puma, or possibly from the match against Will Ospreay, among many others, but he brought his insane talents to Cape Girardeau for a huge match up with the Best of the Best, Austin Lane. Prior to the match, Hunter Hendricks brought out a second referee to stand guard to prevent The Pinnacle from coming to ringside. The match started with some humor as Austin Lane refused to shake Ricochet’s hand, but then business picked up in a hurry as both guys were able to reverse out of a series of chain wrestling holds, in which neither guy was able to gain an advantage, each competitor holding a counter for the other’s move. Ricochet finally gained an advantage outside with a series of chops which led to him being able to hit The People’s Moonsault in the middle of the ring once they returned. However, Austin Lane was able to regain his composure and launch a counter attack and at one point, scoring a 2.9999 count. The athletic abilities of these two wowed the crowd. At one point, Jeff O’Dell tried to interfere, but was caught at the entrance area and sent back. The match ultimately went in the favor of Ricochet, with a wonderful sequence of his Benadryller kick, followed by a high knee to the face, and capped off with a well-executed Shooting Star Press. During the celebration, The Pinnacle ran down to ringside and attacked Austin Lane, which prompted Ricochet to run back out and help his opponent. Hunter Hendricks came out and stated that since Brandon Barbwire was so desperate to get into the main event, that he will be on the next show against 2 TUFF TONY! After that announcement, The Pinnacle was sent back, while Austin Lane thanked Ricochet and the crowd.

 

Cape Championship Wrestling will be back at the AC Brase Arena Building for their next card on September 24th, featuring 2 Tuff Tony and Brandon Barbwire for the CCW Title, plus many matches still to come! Don’t miss out on another great show in September!

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Metro Pro Wrestling Ricky Morton Meet and Greet By Debbie Chmidling

Posted by flairwhoooooo on January 22, 2016

 photo 12458734_10207887962147613_1894534534_o_zpsxjz1fvue.jpg

Ricky Morton, famously one half of the Rock ‘N Roll Express (with Robert Gibson) was on hand to add stories and answer questions about his time in wrestling. He opened by stating, “I am not a Saturday Night Special, this business is what I love.” He is 59 years old, has seven kids, seven grandkids and still wrestles. He said he still doesn’t know he’s old until he sees a recent photo of himself. He wrestles and teaches wrestling because it is all he knows. He said he quit smoking and started using a vaporizer about 2 years ago and now completely stopped and gained 35 pounds. Morton has chosen his last match and it will be Ric Flair in February 2016 in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

The last time he wrestled in Kansas City was 1989 at Memorial Hall and it snowed like hell. The dressing rooms weren’t heated and they had to trudge through deep snow to get to the building. It was Rock N Roll Express vs British Bulldogs. He said he never did get warm that night. He was surprised it wasn’t snowing when he got to Kansas City this time.

On the origin of Rock N Roll express, he was in South West Championship Wrestling with his partner Ken Lucan. He had wrestled in Memphis when Jeff Jarrett and Jerry Lawler were working together. Lawler and Jarrett had a falling out, so Lawler invited him back to Memphis and paired him with Robert Gibson. Lawler bought their wrestling gear at a flea market. The first ring gear bought by Gibson was from Frederick’s of Hollywood. (Now we know how spandex got into wrestling.) Rock N Roll Express were the first to come to the ring to music. Morton and Gibson were partners for 33 years.

 photo 12483295_10207946097520961_785475865_o_zpsqba6vsfh.jpg

Talking of gimmick matches and high-risk moves, Morton contends “It’s just part of the job.” When asked about the chloroform match, Morton stated the Bill Dundee and Bill Watts came up with the idea. He said territories, bookers and other wrestlers depended on each other and the same gimmicks and ideas were used from one territory to the next. 1994 saw one of the best angles in Memphis when Macho Man Randy Savage put him through a table. Morton “…laid there like I couldn’t move, but did not get hurt.” He is still kayfabe. He says he “tries to teach the magic, to make the fans believe.” When asked how many drinks to agree to a scaffold match, Morton said the first time was in Shreveport, Louisiana. He said “There were no drinks involved, we just did it because it was something different. We liked to be innovators.”

When Vince bought out all the territories and bought up all their videos, he started uploading them to the WWE network. No wrestlers in these matches were paid royalties for the matches Vince uploaded. They have uploaded videos of some of the bloodiest matches Morton ever participated in. There is no contract and there are no royalties. Doug Summers sued the WWE for royalties, lost the suit and now has to pay WWEs legal fees.

When Rock N Roll Express were members of the York Foundation at WCW they were scheduled to wrestle in Knoxville, Tennessee. There were no contracts and they were facing Doom. Gibson had been injured at home prior to the match. Morton told him to just get to the ring and stay on the apron. When Gibson tagged in, he fell to the ground and Time Warner paid for everything for a year.

Smokey Mountain Wrestling was owned by Ricky Rubin of Black Crows. It closed because Jim Cornette was leaving to go to WWE. Nash and Bischoff were at WCW and put the company $600 million in the red. Goldberg, Kevin Nash and Bret Hart still had three years on their contracts. They sat and collected the money without ever working.

Upon being asked if he envisioned ever going into the Hall of Fame, he spoke of Rock ‘N Roll Express being brought to WWE by Jim Cornette where they made a mark, especially with Midnight Express but they didn’t stay for long because people weren’t taking care of each other and were getting hurt. He doesn’t think he, or Rock ‘N Roll Express will ever go into the WWE Hall of Fame, but that doesn’t bother him. Morton said “The real hall of fame, The Wrestling Observer Hall of Fame is in Waterloo, Iowa and I was voted in in 2014.”

When asked about Michaels and Janetty stealing their gimmick, Morton said it was a compliment. Michaels patterned himself after Morton. During the time Gibson was injured, Morton and Flair were tearing it up around the country and they wanted to put the belt on Morton. Morton declined because he didn’t want Gibson left behind in the shuffle.

He doesn’t watch wrestling, but as soon as class starts, they catch him up pretty quick.
He was well acquainted for the Von Erichs. He said he knew them all and has a great deal of sadness for Kevin as his mother recently passed away. He said “…they were all into crazy stuff as kids and it just caught up with them.”

Morton told a story about Lawler and his artwork. They were doing a show in a Catholic School when they saw a nun coming toward them. She asked if they knew any artists and he started raving about the talents of Jerry Lawler. The nun took them to the bathroom where they saw artwork on the door. Mickey had Minnie bent over…

When he was in ECW he was wrestling Bam Bam Bigelow and there was a fan calling for spots. Morton turned to the guy and said, “The heel calls the match. Sit down and shut up!”Morton owns the School of Morton in Chuckey, Tennessee. He said, “I gave my life to this business and I’m still out here!”

 photo school of morton_zpsnoshqh9n.jpg

MWR was thrilled to have Debbie Chmidling share with us this great recap of the meet and greet with Ricky Morton from Metro Pro Wrestling. Be sure to check out Debbie’s great recaps in the upcoming MWR Yearbook that will also feature this one as well as ECW Legend Tommy Dreamer and Jim Cornette.

Metro Pro Wrestling returns to Turner Rec Center in Kansas City, KS, on Saturday, January 30, for our first event of 2016! Doors open at 6:15 p.m. Event starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are on sale now!

 photo 10264307_1047309155314389_8518299106489251101_n_zpsutgtmhae.png

– Metro Pro Championship Match: Jeremy Wyatt (c) vs. The Beer City Bruiser. As always, if Wyatt loses, he’s fired.
– ECW/SMW/NWA/WWF star Tracy Smothers vs. The Math Magician
– Brass Ring Challenge – The Winner gets a Metro Pro Championship title shot whenever they wish! Jake Dirden vs. Mark Sterling vs. Devin Thomas vs. Kraig Keesaman
– Women’s Tag Team Match: Angelus Layne/D’Arcy Dixon vs. Lucy Mendez/Miss Natural
– Metro Pro Tag Team Title Match: Kobra Kai Dojo vs. The Riegel Twins
– “Yoga Monster” Mike Sydal vs. Jon Webb
– Also in action: Central States Champion Ace Steel, Kansas Champion Redwing, The Commission, The King Brothers, the KC Wolves, Kiyoshi Shizuka and more!

Front Row: SOLD OUT
General Admission: $15
Kids 5-12 (Does not count front row): $10
Under 5: Free

Tickets on sale now!

Metro Pro Wrestling on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/KCMetroPro

Check out Metro Pro Photos on Facebook: Metro Pro Wrestling Photos

Metro Pro Wrestling airs every Saturday night on Time Warner Cable SportsChannel at 11 p.m. The show replays several times during the week! Check local listings for details.

Time Warner Cable SportsChannel is a regional 24-hour sports network, and it is the ONLY place you can see Metro Pro Wrestling! Catch us on:

• Time Warner Cable SportsChannel – Channel 30 & 323
• Time Warner Cable SportsChannel 2 – Channel 324
• Time Warner Cable Nebraska
• Comcast Cable Channel 44 & 258
• WOW! Cable – Lawrence 37

Turner Rec Center is located at 831 S. 55th St, Kansas City, KS.
For more information, call Metro Pro at (816) 974-7160.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

MWR Fan Spotlight: Randy and Brendan Phillips

Posted by flairwhoooooo on May 9, 2015

 photo 11115884_635813966551556_1606060070_n_zpsx55qrbry.jpg

Brendan and Randy Phillips are all smiles at SICW.

 

MWR Owner and Editor Brian Kelley: For many father and sons a night of pro wrestling is a wonderful way for them to spend time some quality time with each other while taking that rollercoaster of exciting night of wrestling action that will be memories for them for years to come. Today, I am joined with Randy Phillips and his son Brendan: . Guy, I would like to thank you for joining us at Missouri Wrestling Revival.com

Randy: Thanks for having us Brian!

Brian: Randy, let’s start off with you my friend. Where did you grow up and what were your first introduction to pro wrestling and who were you a big fan of?

Randy: I grew up in Homestead, Florida. It’s about 1 hour south of Miami. Born and raised until the age of 21. My first recollection of wrestling was Wrestlemania 2 with Hulk Hogan and King Kong Bundy in the big blue steel cage. I can remember sitting on the living room floor just amazed at how big Bundy was and how cool it was that Hulk could move around for such a big guy around the ring. Obviously in the early to mid 80’s, most kids gravitated towards Hulk Hogan. He was my guy to cheer for. I can remember having the tear away Hulk shirt that my mom watched me tear away and cringed cause that meant she had to buy another one lol. I had the old WWF ring and one Christmas got all of the wrestlers LJN produced. I can recall like it was yesterday waiting in anticipation for Wrestlemania V and the Mega Powers exploding. My cousin and I used to be the Mega Powers (he was Randy Savage and I was Hulk and his sister was Miss Elizabeth).

Brian: Did your dad and you make any wrestling events and what were some of your memories that you recall?

Randy: Dad was really into wrestling for as long as I can remember. He grew up with Championship Wrestling from Florida with Dusty Rhodes and the Briscoes and of course, the big dog back then, the NWA (National Wrestling Alliance). I remember like it was yesterday when Dad took me to my first ever live show, Royal Rumble 1991 at the Miami Arena in Miami.
 photo Royal_Rumble_1991_zps9qebfdnd.jpg

Of course, Hulk Hogan was my pick to win the Rumble and The Ultimate Warrior was gaining speed to succeed him as the man as he was the WWF champion. I remember my dad screaming at me because Randy Savage was racing down during the Warrior vs  Sgt Slaughter title match and he hit Warrior with the scepter. The crowd went crazy and we had a new champion. Dad said Hulk had to win the Rumble so he could take the title off of Slaughter at Wrestlemania VII. From then on, Dad had to order the WWF pay per views so we could watch them all. Mom was a big 4 Horsemen fan, especially Tully and Arn. She always threw up four fingers and told me that this is the symbol of excellence. If the WWF or WCW was in town, we went, house show, tv or ppv. I can recall going to Spec’s (CD store) and meeting The Rock and D’Lo Brown for autographs when The Rock’s autobiography came out. When my wife and I were dating, we heard on a radio station that Hulk Hogan would be in Key Largo to help promote the new gym owned by Kevin Sullivan. We drove 30 minutes to meet him.

Brian: In today’s mainstream wrestling (WWE,TNA,ROH) who are your favorite wrestlers?

 photo John-Cena-2013-John-Cena-Background-HD-Wallpaper_zpsqa2elyzu.jpg

Brendan: WWE – John Cena is my favorite! I also like Sheamus, Dolph Ziggler, Roman Reigns & Lucha Dragons. ROH – Moose, Michael Elgin and ACH

Randy: WWE – Triple H is my all time favorite. I also love to watch Randy Orton, Seth Rollins, Bray Wyatt & Dolph Ziggler. TNA – Before they moved to Destination America, I was a big fan of Bobby Roode, Austin Aries & Taryn Terrel. Since they moved to Destination Amaerica, I do not watch them anymore and only catch the spoiler tapings to stay in touch. ROH – Moose, ACH & The Addiction. ROH is broadcast locally and I started watching them heavily since the wrestlers also come to High Risk Wrestling.

Brian: Prior to making it to a MWR coverage promotion, did you and Brendan attend any of the mainstream events and do you have any fond memories of meeting any of the stars or some of the matches.

Randy: Since Brendan is only 6 years old, we haven’t been able to attend any events as the cost is so high and I don’t want to take him and sit in the nosebleeds where he’ll possibly lose interest. He likes to be up close and that’s just not feasible at this time.

 photo 11117901_635813586551594_228860048_n_zpskirx45eq.jpg

Memories that will last a lifetime with be Brendan and his father spending time so close to the action of wrestling at an Indy event.

 

Brian: What was your first local promotion that you attended and how did you hear about it?

Randy: The first local promotion I attended was SICW to meet Ted Dibiase. I liked his page on facebook and heard he would be there. I then looked up SICW on Facebook and we then attended. Brendan’s first show was High Risk Wrestling and we heard about them through Facebook as well and I liked their page. The Belleville fairgrounds in only 20 minutes from us so I took him to see if he would enjoy it.

Brian: Thankfully, the shows were good enough for you to return. What and who did you enjoy from that event ?

Brendan: SICW – Ricky Cruz & the Midgets. HRW – Moose, Michael Elgin, ACH, Uhaa Nation, Chuck Taylor, reDRagon, & Mike Outlaw

 photo 1_zps7n6v2dfg.jpg

Ricky Cruz and Herb Simmons have been two men that have worked to bring back fans like Randy and Brendan to events that have featured some of the biggest moments in the Midwest.

Randy: From SICW, I liked Ricky Cruz straight away as he had a great flamboyance to him even though he was a “bad guy”.

We hope to have the opportunity to meet him and get a picture at a future show. Honestly, the legends were bringing me to the SICW shows and then we started to enjoy the wrestling. Brendan always asks me who the good guy and bad guys are so he knows how to cheer for them. He has been to enough shows now to know who these guys are and he wants whoever Travis Cook brings out to lose, lol. As for HRW, Frank (the promoter) and I conversed before and during the show and he was kind enough to bring out their champion, ACH for a photo op and the Magic Man Jack Sinn to show him a few magic tricks.

 photo 11039551_635813479884938_85783025_n_zpspfgcl29e.jpg

Brendan loved having his photo with the exciting Ring of Honor and High Risk Wrestling Superstar ACH.

 

The sheer size of Moose instantly caught Brendan’s eyes as well. We have since purchased their DVD’s and watch them from time to time. We also got to meet Bobby Eaton at the first HRW show we went to in October and Brendan asked me who that was? I said, that’s Beautiful Bobby. Brendan went up to him and said, your Beautiful Bobby? Bobby said, I don’t know about Beautiful, but yeah, I’m Bobby Eaton! Lol. I loved it. We got autographs from him and pictures.

Brian: Since that time you have made your way to a few other events. What other promotions have you checked out and what show was your favorite and why?

Randy: We have seen SICW and HRW so far. I don’t like to travel too far for an event, so these promotions are local for us. My favorite show was High Risk Wrestling, Makes a Great Stocking Stuffer as we got to see reDragon, Michael Elgin and ACH. Those guys tear it up no matter how many people are there as long as we cheer loud and I can’t find anyone more pumped to see them than Brendan and I. As for personal appeal, I truly enjoyed meeting the One Man Gang as he was just so genuine to Brendan and couldn’t believe that a 5 year old, at the time, came just to see him.

Brendan: My favorite show was HRW, What High Risk have you done for me lately?. My favorite match was Bolt Brady v.s. Mike Sydal

Brian: Out of the local wrestling stars who have you enjoyed the most and why?

Brendan: I like to watch Mike Sydal, Bolt Brady, Moose, & Chuck Taylor

 photo 11117866_635813926551560_381759172_n_zpsabpafv3w.jpg

Michael Elgin is as dedicated as they come in the ring wrestling against the top stars around the world as well as out of it with his fans.

 

Randy: I enjoy watching Moose, ACH, Ricky Cruz, reDragon, Michael Elgin, Jonathan Gresham.

Brian: You have attended both SICW and High Risk Wrestling, and both have been willing to bring in legends of the sport including the likes of the One Man Gang, Ted Dibiase, Bobby Eaton and Nikolai Volkoff. Randy, you and I grew up with these stars, but prior to making your way to meet them, do the two of you check out old videos of these and Brendan, which one has been your favorites from your dads younger days to watch wrestle?

Randy: Before we go meet a legend, I look them up on the internet and show him pictures. If I have a DVD with them on it, I show Brendan as well.

Brian: I have been a fan of wrestling myself for all my life. During that time I have met some that I really loved, but when I met them in person I was disappointed, and on other occasions have met wrestlers that I became bigger fans of once I did meet them due to their actions to myself and other fans around me. Which one out of those legends has been your favorite to meet in person?

 photo 11091188_635813509884935_2146643597_n_zpsscm1ce3f.jpg

The Phillips join the One Man Gang Army.

 

Brendan: One Man Gang was my favorite legend to meet. And I asked my dad to buy me a OMG t-shirt to wear. We also got a picture with him.

Randy: My favorite legend to meet so far has got to be the One Man Gang as we discussed earlier. We got to meet Ace Cowboy Bob Orton last week in East carondelet.

 photo 11084566_635813439884942_316665490_n_zpsoaelvkyk.jpg

When so many people have nice words to say about you, then it must be true. That is the case as we hear another testament to the kindness and down to earth of one of the greatest tag team wrestlers ever, Beautiful Bobby Eaton.

 

I also garnered a better appreciation after meeting Bobby Eaton as he is just so humble and acts like it’s a pleasure to meet you rather than it is to meet him. So classy.

Brian: You have also had the opportunity to meet the likes of Trevor Murdoch, Michael Elgin, ACH, redDragon and Moose. Out of these or any of the other Indy superstars or former WWE wrestlers you have seen wrestle at this level, whos matches have you enjoyed and why?

Brendan: My favorite match to watch was for the HRW High Risk title, ACH v.s. Ricochet.

Randy: reDragon has amazed me the most as they wrestle at such a high speed that you can’t help but get excited watching them. I get pumped up for Michael Elgin as I love the long standing vertical suplexes he does. He is also very humble and is easily approachable for pictures and just talking in general.

 photo 11084349_635813923218227_1166386888_n_zpsedj1wrhv.jpg

Brian: If I was to start a promotion and I came to you and asked you what I should do to improve on what you have seen, what would it be?

Randy: I know everyone’s not perfect but I see little things like the wrestlers or referees not exactly knowing the rules of certain matches or promotions. For instance, at HRW last time, we had a three way match and the wrestlers had to tag in and out to always keep it one on one. Didn’t make sense to me as the same style match but a 5 way had all of them in the ring at once. Just consistency issues. HRW has no count outs, but one referee kept trying to count them out and we are screaming at the referee that there are no count outs in HRW.

 photo 11099791_635813573218262_1180338124_n_zpsgty402to.jpg

Brendan’s grandparents Maw Maw and Paw Paw.

 

Brian: What are your upcoming events you hope to attend and if someone was to ask you why they should purchase a ticket to a local wrestling event, what would you say?

 photo 11103922_635813973218222_146889090_n_zpsnydehmrn.jpg

Getting photos and autographs with Volkolff at SICW.

Randy: HRW moved to Cahokia, IL. So we are pumped to see who Frank brings in next. SICW keeps bringing the legends that we have to go see and we are truly grateful for that.

Herb was also kind enough to surprise Brendan with letting him hold the SICW Classic title.

Brian: Randy and Brendan thank you so much for joining us today with this interview. I always enjoy seeing you guys at the events that we cover and I feel safe to say that I speak for all the promoters and wrestlers in the Midwest that we appreciate your support of pro wrestling by attending the events and we hope to see you in 2015 soon.

 

 photo 11244909_940166672701140_4960041401379979688_n_zps6srch6rw.jpg

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Matt Murphy thoughts on Ricky Steamboat: The Life Story of the Dragon 3-Disc DVD Set

Posted by flairwhoooooo on July 17, 2010

 

By Matt Murphy -Courtesy of Matt Somebody-The Online Home of Writer and Former Wrestler Matt Murphy

Memories of my childhood idol and thoughts on the recently released DVD set.

WWE takes a lot of heat from traditionalist wrestlers and fans, but the company has certainly shown a commitment to keeping professional wrestling’s rich history alive in recent years.  They’ve done through their annual WWE Hall of Fame inductions and the release of classic video footage via WWE Classics and DVD collections.

There have been dozens of WWE DVD sets released and I hope there are many more.  While I like to watch the matches, I love watching the documentaries.  The stories about wrestlers and promotions, featuring video clips, photos, and interviews, are sometimes more interesting than the in-ring action.

In 2008, I sat quietly in the Harley Race Wrestling Academy while the WWE documentarian interviewed Joe Hennig for The Life and Times of Mr. Perfect and then covered a lot of different topics with Harley Race for what I assume found its way onto several DVDs and WWE Classics features.  It was interesting to watch the way they blacked out the windows, unplugged all telephones, closed the gym next door, rearranged everything in sight, and experimented with different lighting schemes.

When I learned that WWE was going to release a Ricky “the Dragon” Steamboat DVD set, I was thrilled. Steamboat was my childhood idol.  To illustrate my feelings for Steamboat, here’s a piece from the revised edition of my autobiography (available in 2011), now titled, THE SOMEBODY OBSESSION: A JOURNEY FROM THE WELFARE LINE TO THE SPOTLIGHT:

My love for wrestling grew to an obsession in late-1986. During a challenge for the WWF Intercontinental Title, Steamboat suffered a “crushed” larynx at the hands of the defending champion, “Macho Man” Randy Savage. Watching Steamboat gasp for breath while paramedics and WWF officials scrambled to save him, I was first paralyzed with fear. Then I cried. A lot. Steamboat was sidelined for several weeks. I forgot about my own problems and my world revolved around the weekly updates on Steamboat’s condition. During this time, WWF aired an interview with Steamboat’s doctor, who said that “the Dragon” should never step into the ring again, and a vignette in which Steamboat went through speech therapy. On January 3, 1987, Steamboat guest-starred on an episode of Sidekicks, a crime drama starring Ernie Reyes Jr. Later that night, on Saturday Night’s Main Event, Savage was about to injure George “the Animal” Steele the same way he’d injured Steamboat weeks before. “The Dragon” came to ringside, restrained by several WWF officials, and saved his friend Steele.

That was it; I was hooked. My future was decided — I was going to become a professional wrestler just like my idol, Ricky “the Dragon” Steamboat. I immersed myself deep in the mysterious world of wrestling, worshiping Steamboat. He was tough, exciting, and he represented good (me) overcoming evil (all the sources of my childhood angst). When Steamboat beat Savage for the WWF Intercontinental Championship at Wrestlemania III, he did it, I thought, just for me.

When I got into the wrestling business, everyone, it seemed, listed Steamboat as their wrestling idol.  I couldn’t help but feel a little annoyed by it–growing up, everyone around me was a Hulkamaniac and my love for Steamboat had set me apart from the rest of the pack.  Now, I was just another Steamboat fan.

I had the pleasure of meeting Steamboat during an autograph signing before a WLW show in 2004.  I had met countless stars and never asked anyone for an autograph, a fact in which I took a great deal of pride.  But when I met Steamboat, I couldn’t resist getting a Polaroid taken and signed.  B.J. Race, who knew how I felt about “the boys” asking for pictures and autographs, gave me a confused look.  I explained to her that Steamboat was the man who inspired me to become a wrestler.  I’d love to say that the Polariod of me and my idol is prominently displayed in my writing den, but the truth is I was so damned caught up in the moment that I left the picture behind.

I met Steamboat a second time while I was a manager at a bar & grill in Lake Ozark.  He came in with a friend of his and ordered dinner after he appeared at another one of Harley’s shows.  The server placed his check on the table and I hurried to pick it up.

“This one’s on me,” I said.

“Why’s that?” Steamboat asked.

I looked over my shoulder.  I didn’t want to draw attention to him. “Please.  It would mean a lot to me.”

He thanked me and shook my hand. On his way out the door, he waved goodbye and said, “Thanks, Matt.”

The bartender recognized Steamboat and I shushed him long enough for my idol to pull out of the parking lot.

The third time I met Steamboat was before a Ring of Honor show in Dayton, Ohio.  I rode there with my friend Ace Steel, who Steamboat knew well, and we picked him up at the hotel.  He was cordial to me and he chatted away with Ace about Ritchie, Steamboat’s son, who was racing trucks at the time.  I just sat in the back seat and kept my mouth shut, dying to shoot the breeze with Steamboat but shy as a schoolgirl.

Two years ago, Ritchie came to Eldon to train at the Harley Race Wrestling Academy.  We hung out a couple times and he seemed to be a likeable guy, but I hated to see people treat second- and third-generation stars different from the rest of the students and I knew that I wouldn’t treat him the same as everyone else.  How could I?  Soon after Ritchie was born, there was an article in WWF Magazine with pictures of my idol and his newborn son.  Because I was a first-class wrestling nerd with a big imagination, the eight-year-old version of me thought that I would be the guy who’d bridge the gap between Steamboat generations; I imagined that I’d learn the ropes from Ricky as his tag team partner during the last years of his career and then team with Ritchie during the last years of my career. That, of course, didn’t happen, and memories of my wrestling weirdness haunted me when I was around Ritchie.  Somehow, it just felt right to keep my distance from him.  He’s now training with Florida Championship Wrestling in Tampa and is under developmental contract with WWE.

Last year, Steamboat was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame.  The next night, at Wrestlemania, he participated in a handicap match against Chris Jericho.  I couldn’t watch it live.  I’d seen too many legends perform past their prime and I couldn’t stand to watch my idol embarrass himself.  After I read a report of the match on the Internet which described his great performance, I bought the replay and watched it.  Then, the next night, he participated in a 10-man tag team match.  I’m about as emotionless as they come, but there’s a chance that a couple tears trickled down my cheeks while Steamboat battled once again and the crowd chanted, “You’ve still got it!”

The 3-disc DVD set, titled Ricky Steamboat: The Life Story of the Dragon, was released last Tuesday.  I bought it that morning, brought it home, and watched the entire documentary and a few matches.

The documentary was awesome.  It featured interviews with Ricky, several current and former stars, and even Ritchie.  While I watched and listened to “the Dragon” talk about his career, I thought about how he impacted my life and I wished that I could have told him that during any one of our three encounters.

There are a thousand different matches that could have been added to the DVD set, but I’m happy with their selections.  One that I’m especially glad they included was the WCW World Tag Team Title match from Clash of the Champions XVII, a match in which Steamboat made a surprise return, teaming with Dustin Rhodes to beat Arn Anderson and Larry Zbyszko for the championship.  When the match originally aired, it brought me a lot of joy at a time in my life when that was an emotion I seldom felt.

A couple days after Steamboat’s DVD was released, he was hospitalized with serious medical issues.  While I tried to process the information I’d just read, I walked into the living room, where my four-year-old son, Hunter, was holding the Steamboat DVD set.

“Can we watch Ricky Steamdragon?” he asked.

“You mean Ricky ‘the Dragon’ Steamboat?”

“Uh-huh.”

I put in Disc 3, sat down, and made room for my son.  Together, we watched the Iron Man Challenge Match between Steamboat and Rick Rude from Beach Blast ‘92.

“I like Ricky Steamdragon,” Hunter said a few minutes into the match. “He’s my favorite.”

This time, I was happy to hear someone else say that.

For more Matt Murphy check out his website here.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

The Golden Circle: 30 By Greg Anthony

Posted by flairwhoooooo on July 11, 2010

Today’s wrestlers aren’t afraid of being paralyzed,the long term effects of steroids or a half a dozen other reasonable things to be afraid of. The most terrifying thing for a pro wrestler in this era is the number 30. Or more specifically the age 30. The general consensus is that once you’ve hit the magic number, you’ve missed the boat. You may get good opportunities to work good shows but a dream of being a WWE contracted wrestler is over. Is this fact or merely a bitter fiction that has made its bed in our world.

I did some heavy research for this article. I asked the question of several veterans who use to work the territories. Were they afraid of 30 or some other magical number? it wasn’t that they were afraid of 30 but aware of it. If someone hadn’t become a star or had gotten a good as they were going to by the time they hit 30 they usually started making alternative plans for the future. The big difference between then and now is that it was their decision. Plus with several profitable companies and bookers, if one promoter didn’t see anything in you, whose to say the next one wouldn’t.

When Vince started offering contracts to guys like to build a national WWF. He didn’t hire guys 18-20 years old. He hired guys that were seasoned, guys that he knew he could be in relativly any situation and they could perform because this wouldn’t be their first rodeo. And it made for a great product, were from top to bottom you had genuine workers. Guys that were working together to make money. Now everyone wasn’t a Randy Savage or Ricky Steamboat but everyone played their role perfectly.

Now it isn’t to say that WWE has never and will never hire someone over the age of 30. Because they have, most notably guys like The Boogyman and Rico, who were in their late 30s even 40s when hired. The ratio to twenty-somethings vs thirty-plus is a one sided margin for sure. So what is “being in your prime” in pro wrestling now?

Shawn Michaels vs The Undertaker

You look at Shawn Michaels vs The Undertaker, two guys in their 40s who went and had probably the greatest match in Wrestlemania History. Neither man could have had that match when they were 25. Because they hadn’t had the 1000s of matches prior to learn from.

I personally know for a fact that if WWE would have hired me when I was 20 years old, I would have screwed it up in some way. Because I was stupid like all 20 year olds. Its like any sport, you draft someone directly out of high school and you have to deal with a maturing process. You draft a college senior and 4 year starter then,for the most part, you take that maturing process out of the equation. I personally would rather hire someone who is a great worker at 33, that could work for 10 more years than someone who is gonna be just “ok” for 20. But I promise I don’t know everything.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

MWR Spotlight: Luke Roberts (Part 2 of 3)

Posted by Admin on May 15, 2008

Luke Roberts (Part 2 of 3)

By Brian “Flair” Kelley


You have also been an accomplish referee, do you remember the first match that you were a part of in that role?

I honestly don’t remember the first match that I refereed, but I do remember the first show that I refereed on. It was about four years ago. Basically, Butch Fletcher had a referee no-show a Mid-America Extreme show in Cahokia, Illinois. The referee he had for the evening had only refereed one show prior to that one, so he was nervous that he could not handle the job. I knew that I had a pair of black dress pants and my wrestling boots in my bag, so I told him that I would be willing to referee if he wanted me to. He accepted and the rest is history.

A referee can make or break a match. What kind of advice would you give someone that aspired to try to make it in the business?

My advice is simple.

  • Watch what the referees on television do on a regular basis.
  • Don’t speak to anyone unless you are spoken to.
  • Don’t think that, just because you are a referee, you deserve to get involved in the match. Referees are not wrestlers for a reason.
  • Make it a point to associate with the more experienced referees and watch what they do in the ring.
  • Referee on as many shows as you can. Experience is vital for a referee.

What are some of the common mistakes that a referee makes during a match?

The biggest mistakes referees make all relate to not paying attention to the match. I have seen referees make two counts instead of three counts, not disqualifying a wrestler for doing something that is obviously illegal, seeing a wrestler interfere in a match, or counting three when a wrestler’s shoulders are not even on the mat. In addition, referees sometimes think that they are the biggest part of the match and should be treated as such. In my opinion, if a referee gets out of line, big things can and will happen.

How much more difficult is it to be a part of a tag team match than a one on one contest?

In my opinion, tag team wrestling was actually easier than singles wrestling. In most cases, tag team wrestling gives the wrestlers an opportunity to draw on the emotions of the wrestling fan. It really allows the wrestlers to showcase the experience and teamwork that they have as professional wrestlers.

Throughout the years, what match would be your highlight as a referee?

As a referee, I would say that my biggest match was Nick Tyson vs. Alex Shelley in the LWA. The match was outstanding. I was completely focused on the match. Everything was in alignment in the universe that night. Another match that would rank up close to that match was a cage match between “Cowboy” Bob Orton and Greg “The Hammer” Valentine for CJTPAAW.

Just being respected enough by the promotion to referee a match between these two WWE Hall of Fame wrestlers was enough for me. They gave the fans a match that was worthy of their money. I felt honored a couple of years later to spend almost two hours with Greg Valentine, fellow wrestlers “The Punisher”, Rage, Dexter Poindexter, Rick Ruby, and referee Scott Murphy. Scott Murphy thought that Valentine would not remember me at all from that match. Not only did he remember the match, but he complimented me on the job I did that night. That match was definitely one to remember.

In this age of gimmick matches and special stipulations, is there one certain type that you dislike more than any other?

As a referee, I am up for almost any kind of match. Nothing really phases me. I am not really a big fan of the ultra hardcore matches. Those kind of matches really draw people away from professional wrestling. I don’t see any reason why anyone would want to attempt to grossly disfigure themselves for any amount of money.

One aspect of wrestling that is easily is forgotten is the chemistry between the heel manager, his guy and the referee. What manager do you feel was the easiest to work with?

I feel that the manager that was the easiest to work with was Harvard Cornell III. He knows exactly when to draw my attention away from his wrestler or wrestlers. He always gives 100% in the ring and believes that his wrestlers are the best thing ever in professional wrestling

Any stories where you were disgusted with a manager who just did not get it?

There is one manager, who I will not name, that consistently disgusted me. He always made it a point to get involved as many times as possible in the match. I actually asked a couple of friends of mine at the time to count the number of times that this manager interfered or got involved in the match. I believe that they counted over 20 times during the match where the manager got involved. When I got back to the locker room, I voiced my opinion to anyone who would listen. Needless to say, I have not been assigned one of his wrestler’s matches again.

Have you ever been in a situation where you or the wrestlers have forgotten the finish?
I
f I had to count how many times wrestlers forgot things in their matches, I would never finish. Just kidding. I can only think of a handful of times where that has happened.

What wrestler would you say was the easiest to referee?

I can’t really limit this to just one wrestler. I would say that Dingo, Pierre Abernathy, Donovan Ruddick, Steven Kennedy, K.C. Karrington, Gary the Barn Owl, Evan Gelistico, Jordan Lacey, Justin “the Iceman” Wade, Sean Vincent, “Volatile” Curtis Wylde, and Shorty Biggs are wrestlers who make my job as a referee very easy.

In what ways can a wrestler help, and on the flip side hurt, the performance of the referee?

A wrestler can help a referee during a match by their interactions with the referee. A wrestler can make a referee look like the symbol of authority in a match. A wrestler can also make a referee look like a complete moron. In the ring, the match tends to be that much better if the referee has a history with the wrestlers involved.

During the Wrestlemania classic featuring Randy Savage vs. Ricky Steamboat, there was a reported 22 false finishes. Do you feel as if there are too many false finishes in some matches today?

Honestly, I think that there are not enough false finishes in professional wrestling today. False finishes, as you call them, are what makes wrestling fans enjoy matches. It is what keeps the fans wanting to come back and see what it will take to finally defeat a particular wrestler, tag team, or champion. When anyone thinks that a match is going to end and it doesn’t, it shows the wrestling fan that a match can end at any time. It keeps the level of unpredictability of professional wrestling intact.

On a lighter note, when women wrestle against each other, often the ref is used in a comedic role. Is this something that you enjoy or do you find it hard to do?

When promoted and positioned correctly, comedy matches are fun for me. I tend to be very straight laced in the ring, but at times I can’t help myself in matches. Every time I refereed a match for Gary the Barn Owl in LWA, I would almost lose it whenever he would make me flap my arms like he does. In the days of the Arch Town Criminals, Shorty Biggs would make me chuckle when I would try to count to five. I really enjoy comedy matches. They make me remember why I love professional wrestling so much.

Editors Note: The final installment of this interesting and insightful edition of MWR Spotlight will be published in the next few days. I want to thank Luke Roberts for being kind enough to give us a little of his time, and encourage those who would like to be spotlighted, profiled, or interviewed by Missouri Wrestling Revival to contact me.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: