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Posts Tagged ‘Rick Rude’

From the Rebel to the Monarch – Jeremy Wyatt Could Very Well be the Best

Posted by flairwhoooooo on November 30, 2017

By Brian Hoops

Photos Brian Kelley

“Not only is Jeremy Wyatt a great athlete, he also has one of the best minds for the
business. He is SO underrated on a national level that’s its criminal!”NWL Tag Team
champion Michael Strider.

2017 will be known as one of the greatest years for in ring performances in professional
wrestling history. 4 star, 5 star and even 6 star matches are seen from every level of
wrestling this year and one wrestler who has consistently produced some of the best
matches in 2017 is Jeremy Wyatt.

Wyatt may not be a household name nationally, but Wyatt’s talent is on par with any
professional wrestler in any promotion.

Wyatt has carved out a career mostly on the Midwest independent scene but now
wrestles exclusively for the National Wrasslin League, based in Kansas City, Missouri.
Wyatt has been the champion of the 3XWrestling promotion in Iowa, the Central States
Champion and Metro Pro Wrestling champion.

Wyatt, born June 26, 1978 in Kansas City, Missouri has lived in Kansas City his entire
life. Wyatt went to Raytown High School (suburb of Kansas City), excelled in football as
a wide receiver, making 2nd team all conference and all district his senior year and drew
some interest in football powerhouse Northwest Missouri State University, Central
Missouri State and Mid American Nazarene. Wyatt claims baseball was his best sport,
but Wyatt was bored with the sport and never played for his high school team, instead
played for summer league teams.

Raised by his father who worked mostly nights, Wyatt played sports with his friends and
discovered professional wrestling when he was 5 or 6 years old. “My all time favorite
was Sting, followed by Macho Man Randy Savage. I was always drawn to those 2
because their gear was always so colorful and they had ridiculous amounts of charisma.
I met Sting once after a show at Memorial Hall and he talked to me for a good 5 minutes
or so. I was 11 at the time and he was already my favorite and that experience sealed
the deal” Wyatt reminisced.

When Wyatt was younger, he went to every show that came to town. “My friends and I
would sit in either the 1st or 2nd row, and we would always start chants. When you’re a
kid, and everyone joins in, you think you’re the coolest kids in the building.”
“There was a show at Municipal (Municipal Auditorium) and we were in the 2nd row. My
dad’s friend took us. He got a little liquored up and ended up dumping an entire beer on
Rick Rude during a match with Roddy Piper. Security came over, but no one would point
him out since he was with ‘the kids starting all the chants’, everyone said it was ‘some
guy that went running back that way’.”

Wyatt started training in St. Joseph, Missouri in 2001 with a guy named Steve Estes.
Estes taught Wyatt how to bump and other basics, but Estes had a poor reputation in
the wrestling industry which hurt Wyatt when he tried to get bookings. “I was grateful for
the opportunity to get my foot in the door, but I should’ve done more thorough research
and went somewhere more reputable.”

“Steve had such a bad rep that I was guilty by association, and had a stigma placed on
me in the area. Once I was able to get on some shows that didn’t involve him, which
took a few years, people saw I was decent enough to get some opportunities,” Wyatt
remembered.

“Wyatt is this area’s best kept secret. I wish he had traveled more early on. He has a
really good mind for wrestling. His work right now is top notch.” NWL Tag Team
champion Ace Steel.

Once the doors to the independent scene were opened, Wyatt started working matches
in NWA Central States. “Michael Strider (fellow Foundation member) was one of the
guys to vouch for me and push for someone to give me an opportunity. He had some
pull at NWA Central States,” Wyatt remembered fondly.

“When I met Jeremy Wyatt back in 2010, he was already a well-known wrestler in the
Midwest. Since then, he has become the best wrestler I’ve seen who has not signed a
deal with WWE or any other national/international company. When I ran Metro Pro
Wrestling for six years, he was the best champion I had, and he was the backbone of
the company. The years he was on top were the best years we ever had.” – former
WWE writer and Metro Pro Wrestling owner Chris Gough.

“I had a stretch where I went down to Florida in 2010-2011 and had a chance to wrestle
Tyler Black (Seth Rollins) to a 30 minute draw when he was ROH champion. I’ve also
had a couple of matches with Christopher Daniels that I’m really proud of. Daniels is the
guy who drew me to independent wrestling. He is the guy that really stood out to me, so
he ended up becoming my ‘dream match’ back then,” Wyatt remembers.

Wyatt blends his athleticism along with the ability to work his opponents strengths into
telling a story in his matches. It’s a old school approach that works perfectly in the NWL.
“The best thing I’ve ever done was go to a day long seminar with Nick Dinsmore in
summer of 2008. I was floundering a bit, not improving at the clip I wanted. The way he
explained things just seemed to click. Literally felt like a lightbulb coming on. From that
day on, I think my work, and the way I did things changed, very much for the better,”
Wyatt explains.

“In NWL, he’s a very respected ring general who isn’t the most vocal leader, but
definitely leads by example. He’s one of the reasons I continue to enjoy working in
wrestling. It’s the details that make him the best. Every move and decision he makes in
the ring has a purpose. Every sequence is part of a story. Wyatt can make you believe
he can take down a man twice his size because he understands psychology as well as
anyone.” – Chris Gough, NWL Executive.

When working against a giant brawler like Jack Foster, Wyatt incorporated Foster’s
ability to fight and punch into the match, leading to a spot where Foster hit his hand
against the steel ring post and “injured” his hand the rest of the match. Wyatt worked
spots against the injured hand into the match, reminiscent of the nostalgic Andersons
tag team who would injure a body part and work their entire match around the injured
body part.

“He is undoubtedly the pound-for-pound best professional wrestler I have worked with.
That goes for any level – Midwest indie, national indie names, long-time WWE stars. I
still consider him one of the top talents in the country today.” – Midnight Guthrie,
announcer.

Wyatt showed his versatility in a feud with rookie Anthony “Sharkbait” Gutierrez.
Gutierrez is a former MMA fighter who is athletic but transitioning into professional
wrestling. Wyatt worked MMA spots into the match for Gutierrez to shine when he was
on offense and made the match believable and competitive.

“Jeremy is the hardest worker I’ve ever met. He’s continuously working on improving as
a wrestler and is obsessed with having different matches for different scenarios. There’s
no such thing as a “standard Wyatt match”. – Michael Strider

 

Everything Wyatt does is worth purpose. Two of Wyatt’s moniker’s is the “Monarch” and
the “King of Kansas City.” Engraved on his long trunks is the head of a lion; the
“Monarch” and “King of the Jungle.” What many fans may not realize is Wyatt is a huge
baseball fan and the Monarch name is also a tribute to the old Negro baseball league
team that was based in Kansas City, the Kansas City Monarchs.

“I do put a lot of thought into things, I’m going to work a match differently if it’s just a one
off against someone than I would if it’s the 1st match of a new feud. And the same goes
with the 1st match of a feud would be worked differently than the blow off. Just like with
matches, building and telling a story, I like doing the same (probably even more so) with
a long drawn out feud. I think I’ve developed a pretty good idea what works, what
doesn’t. I think I process things pretty well as far as how to feel out the crowd.
Sometimes you have an idea, if they’re not digging it, you have to be able to adjust. I
never go into a match thinking I have to do anything for sake of doing it. If it fits into the
story, cool. If not, I don’t need to force a square peg in a round hole,” Wyatt explained.

Despite being one of the best wrestlers in the Midwest, Wyatt has never really pursued
a chance to wrestle for a national promotion. “Wrestling, as much as I love it, has never
been the be all, end all for me. I am happy with my life, and I never felt the need to
make certain sacrifices that would be needed to ‘make it’ in wrestling.”

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MWR Trading Card #45 B.G. James

Posted by flairwhoooooo on April 18, 2011

Photobucket

Missouri Wrestling Revival is very excited to have the one and only “Road Dogg” BG James as a part of the MWR Trading Card series. The son of 2011 WWE Hall of Fame inductee “Bullet” Bob Armstrong and brothers to fellow wrestlers Brad, Scott and Steve, James will go down in history as one of the most entertaining wrestlers to ever set foot in the ring.

James was instrumental in bringing back WWE from the dire straights in the late 80’s in a war with rival WCW. With fellow stars “Stone Cold” Steve Austin, the Rock and Mick Foley and  James’s  faction of Degeneration X wrestling was cool once again.  .

Degeneration X members included Shawn Michaels, Triple –H, X-Pac, Chyna, Rick Rude and James tag team partner Billy Gunn.

Together James and Gunn was the New Age Outlaws!!

The two would go on to win 5 WWE Tag Team Championships Four of their victories came over teams that included Mick Foley with four different partners (Kane, Terry Funk, the Rock, and Al Snow). They hold the fourth longest reign in WWE Tag Team history with 468 days.
James is also a former WWE Intercontiental and Hardore Champion before he went on to compete at TNA Wrestling to win 2 NWA Tag Team Championships with Ron Killings and Konann.

Though he would be able to hold onto gold several times, it is his charisma that is matched by very few that has made him a World wide star.

We are proud to announce that BG James is number #47 in the MWR Trading Card set.

The artwork of B.G James from the hottest comic in the Midwest, The Promotion. The promotion is drawn from none other than Rob Schamberger.

Please support Rob and his hard work by purchasing a copy of his comic for only .50 cents here.

#1 The Northstar Express Darin Corbin and Ryan Cruz – 2008 MWR Tag team of the Year
#2 Mark Sterling– 2009 MWR Wrestler of the Year
#3 The Hooligans Devin and Mason Cutter – 2009 MWR Tag Team of the Year
#4 MsChif – 2009 MWR Female Wrestler of the Year
#5 Mike Sydal – 2009 Pro Wrestling Illustrated Rookie of the Year
#6 Jeremy Wyatt – 2008 MWR Wrestler of the Year, 2008 & 2009 MWR Match of the Year (vs. Michael Strider, vs. Tyler Cook)
#7 Santana G – Midwest Sweetheart
#8 Kahagas – The Tokyo Monster
#9 Mephisto – Hardcore Favorite
#10 Tyler Black – Ring of Honor World Champion
#11 Sir Bradley Charles – Rising star trained by Lance Storm
#12 Brandon Espinosa – Talented Superstar
#13 Dave Vaughn – The Wrestling Machine
#14 “The Future” Donovan Ruddick – The 6’9″ Monster
#15 Brandon Aarons – Current Triple Crown Champion in the Midwest
#16 Davey Richards – Arguably the best in the world today
#17 “Superstar” Steve Fender – First American wrestler to train in Pro Wrestling NOAH Dojo
#18 MR Late Nite – “Hollywood Super Agent”
#19 Eric Allen – The Pride of Peoria
#20 Eddie Edward – American Wolf
#21 Evan Money – The Pro Wrestling Kid
#22 Delirious – A Familiar Face from “The Edge of Insanity”
#23 Jason Jones – On the Path to Superstardom
#24 Tony Kozina – Rugged and Well-Traveled Veteran
#25 Jeromy Robb Senior Referee at 3XW and MECW
#26 Sean Vincent Canada’s Favorite wrestler
#27 Lucy Mendez – Midwest Latino Knockout
#28 Trevor Murdock – Former WWE Superstar
#29 Eric Davis –Senior referee at IHW and PWE
#30 Angel -ECW Original
#31 Jonathan Greshem– Electrifying young star
#32 Brett Young -#1
#33 Michael Crase Jr -Metro and NWA Dynamo Ref
#34 -U-Gene Dinsmore– Lovable fan favorite.
#35Billy McNeil– Innovating high flyer.
#36 Mia Martinez – Mysterious and fiery, Midwest diva
#37 Mike Sydal – 2010 MWR Wrestler of the Year
#38 Stacey O’Brien-2008 MWR Female Wrestler of the Year
#39Neil Diamond Cutter– Prince of Death
#40Bloody Harker Dirge– God of Thunder
# 41- Brian Breaker– 2011 Pro Wrestling Noah tour
# 42 Brandon Schmitt -WLW and Metro Pro Ref

For a complete list of Missouri Wrestling Revival trading cards as well as WWE , TNA and Japan sets check out the website Wrestling trading cards.com here.

To purchase MWR Trading cards:

1) Catch the star at a show to have them autograph the cards personally
2) Contact them via facebook or myspace
3) Send $1.50 in money order or check for each card at *
Brian Kelley
305 West 3rd Salisbury Missouri 65281

*Checks will take longer to clear than money orders so expect time for that to happen. Make sure you list exactly what card you are wanting to have.

Please note that when purchasing MWR Trading cards from the wrestlers, that they decide the prices for their cards. We highly recommend that you get them from the stars themselves and let them know that you enjoy MWR.

These cards are limited and are not mass produced making them highly collectable.

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Matt Murphy thoughts on Ricky Steamboat: The Life Story of the Dragon 3-Disc DVD Set

Posted by flairwhoooooo on July 17, 2010

 

By Matt Murphy -Courtesy of Matt Somebody-The Online Home of Writer and Former Wrestler Matt Murphy

Memories of my childhood idol and thoughts on the recently released DVD set.

WWE takes a lot of heat from traditionalist wrestlers and fans, but the company has certainly shown a commitment to keeping professional wrestling’s rich history alive in recent years.  They’ve done through their annual WWE Hall of Fame inductions and the release of classic video footage via WWE Classics and DVD collections.

There have been dozens of WWE DVD sets released and I hope there are many more.  While I like to watch the matches, I love watching the documentaries.  The stories about wrestlers and promotions, featuring video clips, photos, and interviews, are sometimes more interesting than the in-ring action.

In 2008, I sat quietly in the Harley Race Wrestling Academy while the WWE documentarian interviewed Joe Hennig for The Life and Times of Mr. Perfect and then covered a lot of different topics with Harley Race for what I assume found its way onto several DVDs and WWE Classics features.  It was interesting to watch the way they blacked out the windows, unplugged all telephones, closed the gym next door, rearranged everything in sight, and experimented with different lighting schemes.

When I learned that WWE was going to release a Ricky “the Dragon” Steamboat DVD set, I was thrilled. Steamboat was my childhood idol.  To illustrate my feelings for Steamboat, here’s a piece from the revised edition of my autobiography (available in 2011), now titled, THE SOMEBODY OBSESSION: A JOURNEY FROM THE WELFARE LINE TO THE SPOTLIGHT:

My love for wrestling grew to an obsession in late-1986. During a challenge for the WWF Intercontinental Title, Steamboat suffered a “crushed” larynx at the hands of the defending champion, “Macho Man” Randy Savage. Watching Steamboat gasp for breath while paramedics and WWF officials scrambled to save him, I was first paralyzed with fear. Then I cried. A lot. Steamboat was sidelined for several weeks. I forgot about my own problems and my world revolved around the weekly updates on Steamboat’s condition. During this time, WWF aired an interview with Steamboat’s doctor, who said that “the Dragon” should never step into the ring again, and a vignette in which Steamboat went through speech therapy. On January 3, 1987, Steamboat guest-starred on an episode of Sidekicks, a crime drama starring Ernie Reyes Jr. Later that night, on Saturday Night’s Main Event, Savage was about to injure George “the Animal” Steele the same way he’d injured Steamboat weeks before. “The Dragon” came to ringside, restrained by several WWF officials, and saved his friend Steele.

That was it; I was hooked. My future was decided — I was going to become a professional wrestler just like my idol, Ricky “the Dragon” Steamboat. I immersed myself deep in the mysterious world of wrestling, worshiping Steamboat. He was tough, exciting, and he represented good (me) overcoming evil (all the sources of my childhood angst). When Steamboat beat Savage for the WWF Intercontinental Championship at Wrestlemania III, he did it, I thought, just for me.

When I got into the wrestling business, everyone, it seemed, listed Steamboat as their wrestling idol.  I couldn’t help but feel a little annoyed by it–growing up, everyone around me was a Hulkamaniac and my love for Steamboat had set me apart from the rest of the pack.  Now, I was just another Steamboat fan.

I had the pleasure of meeting Steamboat during an autograph signing before a WLW show in 2004.  I had met countless stars and never asked anyone for an autograph, a fact in which I took a great deal of pride.  But when I met Steamboat, I couldn’t resist getting a Polaroid taken and signed.  B.J. Race, who knew how I felt about “the boys” asking for pictures and autographs, gave me a confused look.  I explained to her that Steamboat was the man who inspired me to become a wrestler.  I’d love to say that the Polariod of me and my idol is prominently displayed in my writing den, but the truth is I was so damned caught up in the moment that I left the picture behind.

I met Steamboat a second time while I was a manager at a bar & grill in Lake Ozark.  He came in with a friend of his and ordered dinner after he appeared at another one of Harley’s shows.  The server placed his check on the table and I hurried to pick it up.

“This one’s on me,” I said.

“Why’s that?” Steamboat asked.

I looked over my shoulder.  I didn’t want to draw attention to him. “Please.  It would mean a lot to me.”

He thanked me and shook my hand. On his way out the door, he waved goodbye and said, “Thanks, Matt.”

The bartender recognized Steamboat and I shushed him long enough for my idol to pull out of the parking lot.

The third time I met Steamboat was before a Ring of Honor show in Dayton, Ohio.  I rode there with my friend Ace Steel, who Steamboat knew well, and we picked him up at the hotel.  He was cordial to me and he chatted away with Ace about Ritchie, Steamboat’s son, who was racing trucks at the time.  I just sat in the back seat and kept my mouth shut, dying to shoot the breeze with Steamboat but shy as a schoolgirl.

Two years ago, Ritchie came to Eldon to train at the Harley Race Wrestling Academy.  We hung out a couple times and he seemed to be a likeable guy, but I hated to see people treat second- and third-generation stars different from the rest of the students and I knew that I wouldn’t treat him the same as everyone else.  How could I?  Soon after Ritchie was born, there was an article in WWF Magazine with pictures of my idol and his newborn son.  Because I was a first-class wrestling nerd with a big imagination, the eight-year-old version of me thought that I would be the guy who’d bridge the gap between Steamboat generations; I imagined that I’d learn the ropes from Ricky as his tag team partner during the last years of his career and then team with Ritchie during the last years of my career. That, of course, didn’t happen, and memories of my wrestling weirdness haunted me when I was around Ritchie.  Somehow, it just felt right to keep my distance from him.  He’s now training with Florida Championship Wrestling in Tampa and is under developmental contract with WWE.

Last year, Steamboat was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame.  The next night, at Wrestlemania, he participated in a handicap match against Chris Jericho.  I couldn’t watch it live.  I’d seen too many legends perform past their prime and I couldn’t stand to watch my idol embarrass himself.  After I read a report of the match on the Internet which described his great performance, I bought the replay and watched it.  Then, the next night, he participated in a 10-man tag team match.  I’m about as emotionless as they come, but there’s a chance that a couple tears trickled down my cheeks while Steamboat battled once again and the crowd chanted, “You’ve still got it!”

The 3-disc DVD set, titled Ricky Steamboat: The Life Story of the Dragon, was released last Tuesday.  I bought it that morning, brought it home, and watched the entire documentary and a few matches.

The documentary was awesome.  It featured interviews with Ricky, several current and former stars, and even Ritchie.  While I watched and listened to “the Dragon” talk about his career, I thought about how he impacted my life and I wished that I could have told him that during any one of our three encounters.

There are a thousand different matches that could have been added to the DVD set, but I’m happy with their selections.  One that I’m especially glad they included was the WCW World Tag Team Title match from Clash of the Champions XVII, a match in which Steamboat made a surprise return, teaming with Dustin Rhodes to beat Arn Anderson and Larry Zbyszko for the championship.  When the match originally aired, it brought me a lot of joy at a time in my life when that was an emotion I seldom felt.

A couple days after Steamboat’s DVD was released, he was hospitalized with serious medical issues.  While I tried to process the information I’d just read, I walked into the living room, where my four-year-old son, Hunter, was holding the Steamboat DVD set.

“Can we watch Ricky Steamdragon?” he asked.

“You mean Ricky ‘the Dragon’ Steamboat?”

“Uh-huh.”

I put in Disc 3, sat down, and made room for my son.  Together, we watched the Iron Man Challenge Match between Steamboat and Rick Rude from Beach Blast ‘92.

“I like Ricky Steamdragon,” Hunter said a few minutes into the match. “He’s my favorite.”

This time, I was happy to hear someone else say that.

For more Matt Murphy check out his website here.

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New Breed Wrestling Alliance- December 6th, 7 WWE Stars

Posted by flairwhoooooo on November 30, 2008

dec608

New Breed Wrestling Alliance- December 6th, 7 WWE Stars

 

Saturday December 6th in Rantoul IL, New Breed Wrestling Alliance delivers and early Christmas presents for Pro Wrestling fans when they bring 7 former WWE Stars. The show starts at 2:00 P.M. and tickets are only $10.00.

 

Here is a brief rundown of the 7 former WWE Stars with the lineup for a night you wont forget.

 

 

 Jake Roberts

 

Jake “The Snake” Roberts is considered one of the most talented promo guys in the sport. He is the inventor of one of the most influential moves in wrestling history, the DDT.  His classic feuds with Ricky Steamboat and Rick Rude are still talked about today. Jake often brings in a live snake to the ring which he would put on top of his opponents after knocking them out with the DDT to win the match. One of the most discussed wrestlers in the past 3 decades; you do not want to miss Jake “The Snake “Roberts.  

 

Cowboy Bob Orton

 

The Father of Randy Orton, Cowboy Bob Orton’s legacy in the sport has been cemented with the honor of being named a member of the WWE Hall of Fame. Nicknamed Ace by Roddy Piper, Bob Orton was Pipers body guard when WWE took over the world in the 80’s. Bob always wore a cast on his left forearm claiming he was healing from an injury during a 1985 battle with Jimmy Snuka, but opponents would have to watch out because Cowboy would in turn use the cast as weapon.

 

Honky Tonk Man

 

The Honky Tonk Man is one of the most charismatic wrestlers ever to grace the sport. He has headlined major WWE arenas with around the country. The Honky Tonk Man will be the first to tell you that he is “The greatest Intercontinental Champion of All Time”. Defeated Ricky the Dragon Steamboat on June 2, 1987 and did not relinquish the title until 454 days later to the Ultimate Warrior.  The Honky Tonk Man thrills the fans with singing his unforgettable entrance theme, “Cool, Cocky, Bad,”.

 

 

Pat Tanaka

 

 Pat Tanaka has thrilled fans around the world in organizations such as AWA. NWA, New Japan and WWE. One half of the tag team The Orient Express with Akio Sato, who was managed by Mr. Fuji. Matches with the Rockers (Shawn Michaels and Marty Jannetty) thrilled fans high profile, high flying match at the 1991 Royal Rumble. The Orient Express were ranked in the PWI 100 Tag teams during the “PWI years”

 

 

Danny Basham

 

Danny is one half of the 2 time WWE Tag Team Champions with Doug Basham. Trained by Jim Cornett and Danny Davis at Ohio Valley Wrestling. He has the perfect balance of speed and power to overwhelm his opponents. This is your chance to see Danny before he is called back to the WWE or TNA

 

Rosey

 

 Rosey is a member of the famous Samoan family, with Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson being one of his cousins. When the wrestler Hurricane “discovered” Rosey’s potential as a superhero, he christened him “Rosey, the Super Hero in Training”.  The two would go on and win the WWE Tag Team Championship together. Since leaving WWE, Rosey has kept busy around the world.

 

 

Tracy Smothers

 

The Wild Eyed Southern Boy Tracy Smothers, is one to never back down from a fight.  Tracy can get under wrestlers and fans skins alike with his actions and words. Tracy has been in WWE, WCW and ECW in his illustrious career.  He is one of the most traveled wrestlers in the sport today. 

 

Moondog Cujo

 

One of the famous Moondog’s. The Moondogs were known for wrestling in blue jeans, sporting shaggy blond hair and beards and carrying animal bones around with them (which they would chew on and use as weapons) Cujo would be honored with the Professional Wrestling Illustrated 1993 Feud of the year in 1993 when they thrilled fans with their matches with Jerry Lawler and Jeff Jarrett.

 


Show will be at The Lincoln’s Challenge Academy Gymnasium
and the address is 118 E. Borman Ave. at 2:00 PM,

 

11 Awesome matches!

 

Jason Vendetta vs. DaCobra in a ladder match.

Cecil Cerveza & Cowboy Bob Orton vs. Jeff Harris & Danny
Basham.

Brandon Keith vs. Rosey.

Eric Ruffington vs. Honky Tonk Man.

Blake Steel vs. Jake “The Snake” Roberts .

 

Danny McKay and Moondog Cujo vs. Tracy Smothers and Joey Grunge

Aaron Mathews vs. Sgt. Jones in a boot camp match

Fatal 4 Way tag team match….The Worlds Greatest Masked Team (Cheapshot McGrot & Cyclone) vs. Encore (D’Andre King & Vic The Pitbull Santelli) vs. The Killer Bee’s (Morton Von Prose/Jonathan Napier & Josh Powers) vs. the team of Wild Bill and Nicky The Weasel Mankotti.

 

Simply Divosi vs. Pat Tanaka

 

I was able to catch up with NBWA Star Simply Divosi to discuss his upcoming match with Pat Tanaka

 

Plus a Title vs. Title Match between “Bloody” Harker Dirge and Issan Hadeev.

 

Show will be at The Lincoln’s Challenge Academy Gymnasium
and the address is 118 E. Borman Ave. at 2:00 PM,

 

( Card subject to change)

 

 

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